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It doesn't get more cute and colorful than TwinBee Yahoo!: Great Rampage in a Mysterious Country

September 12, 2015

Konami can dish them out can't they? Twinbee has always been a combination of color, creativity, and just plain cuteness to boot. Fans of shooters who have had a helping of this classic shooter game know exactly what I mean. It goes by various names. 

TwinBee Yahoo!: Great Rampage in a Mysterious Country, Tsuin Bī Yahho!: Fushigi no Kuni de Ōabare, and even though a U.S. version was planned for release and never happened, it did at least manage to land the title of "Magical Twinbee". The series basically your average vertical scrolling shooter, except this time with a twist.

The zany graphics, anime style characters, and unique battle system make Twinbee a not so average shooter, and one worthy of more than one mention. Yahho was released as a coin-op arcade game back in in 1995, and during that same year it managed to make it to the Playstation and Saturn game consoles.

Later on would land on the PSP Playstation Portable in 2007 as a somewhat "deluxe pack" with its predecessor Detana! Twinbee and Detana! Twinbee Yahho! Color names wouldn't you agree?

Unlike Gradius, Parodius, and the Salamander games with their patented menu bars at the bottom for powering up your ship, players in this game will make use of what is called a "charged shot" setup. The setup includes the normal option from Detana, while you can also select a charged punch, and a charged split. The split allows you to shoot replicas of your ship at the enemies. 

Sega Saturn

Powering up your ship is as easy as shooting bells in the sky, or gathered from the ground by destroying ground enemies. The bells will change color, and thus various power up attributes by shooting at them over and over. Twinbee is another one of those games you never got to play, unless you owned a Japanese console, lived in Japan to play the arcade version, or used some emulator to try it out.

They certainly get the good stuff, but as generations come and go, those who managed to experience the love and affection of the series can at least produce articles like this one to share with others and spread awareness.

We can't allow precious gems like these to pass into oblivion, and this shooter was so popular in its home country that the powers that be managed to see fit to even bring to television in the form of anime episodes. See below for that nugget of joy, and take a look at the game play video and get an understanding of how beloved shooter games like Twinbee are a vanishing breed, and one that should never be forgotten. Am I right? Of course I am.


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